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  • Added Value

    Posted on 25 June 2010

    Added Value is the extra, over and above the basic product or service offer that an organisation makes to its customers. This added value represents extra benefits that can truly delight the customers and keep them loyal.

  • Behaviour

    Posted on 25 June 2010

    Or: The way that you do things.

  • Code of Practice

    Posted on 25 June 2010

    Many trade associations and professional bodies have a Code of Practice that guides members on how they should conduct their business.

  • Comparable organisation

    Posted on 25 June 2010

    Some organisations don’t have competitors in the normal commercial sense of the word. Government organisations like the Inland Revenue and the Police are good examples.

  • Competitive advantage

    Posted on 25 June 2010

    Although a competitor is an organisation that offers products or services that are similar to those offered by your organisation. Your organisation may have the competitive advantage.

  • Competitor

    Posted on 25 June 2010

    Most organisations are not the only ones that provide particular products or services. Most customers can choose to use the products or services of another organisation rather than yours.

  • Complaint

    Posted on 25 June 2010

    When a customer feels strongly enough that his or her customer expectations have not been met, he or she may make a complaint.

  • Consistent service

    Posted on 25 June 2010

    Customer satisfaction is affected by customer expectations about the service they will receive. If the customer service they receive is different from what they expected, there is always a danger that customer satisfaction will be lower than expected.

  • Contingency model of an organisation

    Posted on 25 June 2010

    A way of looking at an organisation that recognises that it is shaped and defined by many things including its people, the technology it uses, its structure and culture and what is going on in the world outside.

  • Continuous improvement

    Posted on 25 June 2010

    Many organisations try to keep ahead of competitors by providing better customer service. If competitors also do this, organisations have to keep improving their customer service to stay ahead. So the process of continuous improvement helps organisations to make sure this happens as a matter of routine.

  • Contract

    Posted on 25 June 2010

    A contract is an agreement between two parties that can be enforced by law. A contract does not have to be in writing but it is more difficult to prove if it is not in writing.

  • Costs and resources

    Posted on 25 June 2010

    Delivering customer service involves an organisation in spending money and using resources such as staff time, equipment and materials. It is important for you to understand what costs and resources are involved in delivering customer service in your organisation.

  • Customer

    Posted on 25 June 2010

    A customer is somebody who receives customer service from a service deliverer.

  • Customer charter

    Posted on 25 June 2010

    Some organisations choose to tell customers about their service offer in a statement of what they will do for the customer and call it a customer charter.

  • Customer expectations

    Posted on 25 June 2010

    Customer expectations are what people think should happen and how they think they should be treated when asking for or receiving customer service.

  • Customer experience

    Posted on 25 June 2010

    Customer experience is what a customer feels and remembers about the customer service that he or she has received.

  • Customer feedback

    Posted on 25 June 2010

    Customer feedback is information about customer perceptions of customer service collected by the organisation from customers or given to the organisation by customers.

  • Customer information

    Posted on 25 June 2010

    Service providers collect information about their customers that helps them to deliver effective customer service. This information may be as simple as names and addresses and the products and services that they have chosen.

  • Customer loyalty

    Posted on 25 June 2010

    Some customers tend to return to the same service deliverer and this is customer loyalty. Obviously customer loyalty can be built up if the customer experience of an organisation has been good.

  • Customer preferences

    Posted on 25 June 2010

    Each customer is an individual and customers tend to have different likes and dislikes. Sometimes, in order to deliver consistent customer service an organisation chooses to do things in exactly the same way for every customer.